Sayer versus the Said

Going back to the previous post, about voicing and authority…

First, in the spirit of this post, this blog is holding GENcon14, an annual semi-annual conference.  Speakers will be chosen from the General Authorities and Auxiliary leaders of Themselves.

Seriously, next week, new voices…

Second:

It would be interesting to have an entire month where the “source” of some statement was forbidden from being tied to what was said.  Maybe November could be, “I don’t care who said it month”?

How many quotes from General Conference would appear little different from daytime tv, or car commercial life-philosophy?  Moreover, what if rather than saying, “Denver Snuffer said…” or “Daymon Smith said…” (if ever that has been said to summon authority!), or “The Lord said…” or “The Book of Mormon said…” instead we were only allowed to say what was said?

How would we decide which to believe, or to disbelieve?

As folks believing in unnatural or extraordinary happenings, like the Book of Mormon being a translation of an actual, ancient record of a ruined people, we confront problems that, for instance, atheists no longer worry about: namely, what should I believe, when positivism is not sufficiently explanatory for what I’ve experienced?  Or, what should I disbelieve, given that I cannot set the limits on what is impossible (other than, say, scholastic theological conundrums like God making a boulder He cannot lift, or a married bachelor)?   If we don’t have the refuge of unbelief–proposed to be defined as: a positive believing against some belief we have no reason, logically or rationally, to decide against–how can we decide which track to follow?  A man in a white robe is to guide us?  Or an Iron Rod?  Or…